About

We are two suburban moms living about 30 miles north of L.A. On November 9, 2016, we sat at the park with several other suburban moms, shocked by the election results and wondering what we would do to fight back against an administration that embodied and promoted so much hatred of others - women, Muslims, immigrants, etc. And while we felt that our own daily lives may not be profoundly affected by the new administration, we knew instinctually that many people's lives would be, so we got to work. Immediately. Six days after the election, we met for lunch and decided to gather our tribe of mostly white, mostly middle-class, suburban women and figure out what to do. Two weeks later we had our first meeting - there were 22 women there. Before we participated in Move On's first resistance call; before the Indivisible Guide was published; before we had any idea WHAT we were going to do, we discovered some important things about suburban women and activism. Barriers such as time commitments and distance to events were a concern for many women; as were fears about what friends and family would think if they became political; concerns about safety; and a general sense of overwhelm - where to start, would anything work, and what if we offended people? So we brainstormed ways to overcome those barriers and created Suburban Women's Advocacy Network (SWAN).  

 SWAN at the Women's March in Los Angeles. January 21, 2018 (photo by Aimee Porter)

SWAN at the Women's March in Los Angeles. January 21, 2018 (photo by Aimee Porter)

We were acutely aware that our own suburban apathy and complacency had contributed to the situation we now found ourselves facing, so we jumped in with both feet and haven't turned back. We began researching everything we could about things happening not only with the new administration, but also within our own community with regards to marginalized communities. Then we started organizing what we learned and sharing it with our group, and the group grew, and we started taking action. We hold a monthly in-person forum organized around a quarterly focus. For 2017, our quarters are: women's rights; immigration; the un- and underinsured; and Muslims. We are working to make political activism and social advocacy accessible for suburban women, and to build bridges with other communities.

Once upon a time, Darlynn was a middle school teacher, but now is a parent educator and the mom of two boys. Danielle had a career in marketing and fundraising in the nonprofit sector and now is a stay at home mom to two boys. We met several years ago while serving on the board of our children's elementary school, where we learned that we are both really good at community organizing. You can email us at info@swanactivists.com if you have any questions, would like additional info, or just want to say hi.